Grandmaster Liu Yun Qiao

Grandmaster Liu Yun Qiao, style-named Xiao Chen, was born in Beitou Village, Cangzhou County, Hebei Province.

As a child, Grandmaster Liu was in very poor health. At the age of five, at the request of his father, he learned Tai Zu Changquan (Emperor's Longfist) from their family bodyguard Zhang Yao Ting in order to help improve his condition. His initial martial arts training was intended to activate improved blood circulation and activate his qi. He went on to also learn Mizong I from Zhang Yao Ting. When Liu was seven, his father hired the baji/spear Master Li Shu Wen. Well known for his martial arts skills throughout five Northern provinces, he became Liu's personal trainer, living in the Liu estate. For more than ten years Liu was personally trained daily in Li Shu Wen's system of bajiquan, pigua zhang, and liuhe da qiang (six harmony big spear). This provided Liu with a solid foundation in the martial arts which lasted throughout his life.

At age twenty, Liu traveled throughout Shandong province with Li Shu Wen. He learned his system of Yang style taijiquan, including the sword and sabre, and the kun wu sword from his senior kung fu brother the General/Warlord Zhang Xiang Wu. Li Shu Wen later modified the kun wu sword by adding numerous fajing movements to create two levels of the baji sword. Through Zhang Xiang Wu, Liu was introduced to the liuhe tanglang quan (six harmony praying mantis) Master Ding Zi Cheng and he proceeded, through discipleship, to learn the system. At the age of twenty-six he was introduced to the Yin Fu bagua Master Gong Bao Tian and followed him as a closed-door-student to Yantai, Shandong province to intensely study this complex martial art. All three martial artists were distinguished masters of their time. From that point on, Liu traveled throughout Northern China accepting and winning challenges from other Chinese, Russian, and Japanese practitioners. During this time he exchanged martial arts knowledge with many martial arts masters, such as the great Chen taiji master, Chen Fake. As he matured, Liu's philosophy encompassed more and more of the Daoist yin yang theory of universal change. Baji/pigua, baguazhang, and liuhe tanglang quan became the three capital pillars of his martial arts tripod supported by the three philosophical schools of Confucius, Buddhism, and Daoism. His martial arts system embodied both physical and spiritual essence yielding a traditional virtue which influenced many generations of current martial artists.

After July 7th, 1937, Liu was admitted into Huangpu Military School, 7th Branch, 15th Session. He received his military training in Feng Xiang, Shaanxi Province. After his graduation in the spring of 1939, he was assigned to Tai Hang Mountain. He engaged in many life and death battles during this time. He was appointed as a Company Commander, a Battalion Commander, and later a Regimental Commander in the First Army Division.

At age thirty-two (1941), he was appointed the commander of the Northwest China Reconnaissance Troop. In that year, he also married Zhu Jian Xia of Bao Ji County. Throughout their lives they shared both the hardships and happiness of their time.

In 1943, Liu was appointed as the General Staff Director of the Sichuan and Shaanxi Border District Headquarters. In 1949, he arrived in Taiwan. He held the posts of Director of Personnel Department of the Paratroopers' Headquarters, Colonel General Staff of the Personnel Sub-Department of the National Defense Ministry; and the Northern District Center Director of the Logistics Department of the General Headquarters. He retired from military service and devoted his time toward the popularization and preservation of the traditional martial arts of China.

In 1968, Grandmaster Liu traveled throughout the overseas Chinese communities of Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines to demonstrate and teach his traditional martial arts. Upon returning to Taiwan, he was recommended to Mr. Jiang Jin Guo by his fellow officer General Kong Ling Sheng to the position of martial arts coach for the President's Garrison. He spent many hard and intense hours training these personnel. In March, 1978, he created four sessions to develop martial arts trainers and established the Seven Seas Garrison Group. Liu also started the Journal of Martial Arts and the Wu Tan Development Center for Traditional Chinese Martial Arts. During this twenty year period Grandmaster Liu also served as security for Jian Gai Shek, Jiang Jing Guo, and Li Deng hui. In addition to the martial arts center, Liu established ten branches throughout Taiwan and ten overseas divisions. His disciples number near 10,000 and many have established their own schools overseas.

Grandmaster Liu often said that "only by being able to see our infinity can one's life be refined and developed from time to time." From childhood until his advanced age, Grandmaster Liu always practiced this philosophy. Although Grandmaster Liu has passed away, his spirit continues to grow for he had seen the mystery of infinity and many new lives have been touched by his martial arts and philosophy. He was, we are; his spirit will never die.

Yang Xiao Dong (Tony Yang)

Chinese descent, born and raised in Taiwan. He has been studying martial arts for over 40 years. His specialties include Baji, Praying Mantis, Tai Chi, Hsing-I, and Bagua.

He began studying at age 6 under the instruction of his uncle, a martial arts master. He learned Northern Shaolin and three-section staff. During high school he studied Tang Lang Quan (Praying Mantis Kung Fu). He then moved to Taipei and became a student of Grandmaster Su Yu-Chang, of the Praying Mantis system. It was Grandmaster Su who introduced Master Yang to Grandmaster Liu Yun Chiao. For two years, he studied under both teachers and then became solely a student of Grandmaster Liu. During this time he practiced Tai Chi, Baji, Praying Mantis, and various weapons. He also received personal instruction from Grandmaster Liu in Bagua, Pigua, Mizong, Baji and numerous weapons. Grandmaster Liu learned his Baji from Master Li Shu Wen. At age 24, he was allowed by Grandmaster Liu to teach martial arts, a high compliment indeed. He was soon instructing at five colleges, teaching classes in Tai Chi and Praying Mantis. During this time of intense dedication and training, he also taught Tai Chi and sword to elderly students at a mountain temple. Before coming to America, he taught the Chinese Acrobats of Taiwan for four years.

In May, 1980, Master Yang came to the United States and settled in Canton, Ohio. He has since opened his own martial arts school, Wu Tang Center for Martial Arts and continues to teach there. Well versed in a wide range of martial arts techniques, his favorites are Praying Mantis and Baji. The Bagua weapon, Deerhorn Knives (Lu Jiao Dao, or Zi Wu Yuan Yang Yue), is his foremost weapon. They are said to have been invented during the shrouded infancy of Bagua, probably in the Qing dynasty. The weapon can be used to grab, block, or hook an opponent or their weapon. Many moves are designed to disarm the opponent. The original shape only had three pointed ends. Later, a fourth was added to increase its ability to catch, trap and lock. In recent history, Grandmaster Liu modified the shape by making the fourth point recurve. Other names sometimes used include double moon hooks, meridian axes, crescent knives, Mandarin Duck Axes (Zi Wu Yuan Yang Yue), Sun Moon Sword (Ri Yue Qian Kun Jian), and Deer Hook Sword. Two deer-horn knives form the symbol of the Wu Tang organization. The eight points represent the Ba ji style, inside the circle are yin and yang representing Tai Chi, and together they symbolize Bagua.

Jamie Hooper

Shifu Jamie Hooper began his martial arts career in 1971 after seeing Bruce Lee in what was released in the US as "The Chinese Connection" (we now know that the labels were accidentally switched at the factory with "Fists of Fury").

In 1971 North Alabama offered little in the way of martial arts variety, so at age eight Sifu Hooper started training in what is known now as "old" Taekwondo. Traveling extensively throughout the US to compete in Martial Arts Tournaments gave him the opportunity to meet many masters in a wide array of styles. Being a gifted student, he was able to learn a great deal from many masters who he met at these events. During the twelve years in which he competed he won nearly 600 Titles including 65 Grand Champion Titles. In 1981 he was rated as one of the top three competitors in the US and nicknamed "High-Kicking Jamie Hooper" by Karate Illustrated magazine who called him one of the top ten kickers in the Nation.

He started trainining at the age of 8 years old and by 15, he had intensified his training to over 7 hours per day. Shifu Hooper has studied many different martial systems including but not limited to: MiZong Luohan, Northern Shaolin, Hung Gar, Baguazhang, Xing Yi Quan, Multiple Styles of Northern Praying Mantis, the complete system of Wu Dang sword, and both Chen and Yang Style Taijiquan. He has studied and trained with some of the most prestegious martial artists in the world and is a disciple of Wu Tang Martial Arts under Grandmaster Tony Yang. There is no other martial arts training in the state of Alabama that offers the variety of systems taught by Shifu Hooper.

As an instructor, he has had numerous students win National Titles. Some of his students have even gone on to have successful careers in Television and Movies. Having also been inspired at a young age (by a Jackie Chan Movie) to learn Gymnastics and Tumbling, he trained with a coach from the US Olympic Gymnastics Team and a member of the famous Beijing Circus. He later began teaching Tumbling to the local High School Cheerleading Squad and soon he was teaching squads all over North Alabama achieving great success. Several of his squads won National Cheerleading Competitions.

Although he came from the small town (approx. 3000) of Moulton, AL he went on the accomplish what no other Martial Artist from the South has done before or since. Shifu Jamie Hooper is one of the most outstanding Martial Artists of the 20th century.

Wisdom For Training

Empty Hand Arts

Iron Hard Hands - Cotton Soft Wrist - Supple Whip Arm - Spinning Wheel Elbow - Unified Scapular - Loose Hanging Shoulders - Wide Open Chest - Snake Slithering Waist - Open and Closed Hips - Rounded Crotch - Bent Knee - Spring Loaded Feet - Swift Flowering Steps

Staff Arts

A Staff that has been struck out is difficult to take back - An unattached Staff is difficult to move - Entangling a Staff is liable to make one forget the enemy - Moving the Staff in a disorderly matter will show signs of weakness - Bring both ends of the Staff into combination - The wrist must be flexible - The action of he body waist and legs must be quick.

Spear Arts

Spear hitting, but the Spears never met - They start like the wind, and retreat like nails - When the Spears meet, they stick - One does not see the other - It goes like the wing when you start the move.

Saber Arts

A Saber is like a Tiger - It sees red the moment it strikes - The struggle has come to a life and death situation - The sound of the Saber ringing startles even the toughest opponent.

Sword Arts

Li Chi Lin said "When practicing the Wu Tang Sword one must never have evil thoughts".

The body must flow like fluid - never having any stalling moves - After a long time of practice, the Body and the Sword becomes one - The Mind and the Sword become one - Where ever you are, you become the Sword - The art is about whatever you want the Sword to do - It will react when there is no Sword - There are Swords everywhere - You can pick up any object and use it as a Sword - Everything after this is my teaching to you.

Wu Tang Etiquette and Proper Protocol Toward Your Shifu

1. Honor your Shifu.

2. Listen very carefully, consider his knowledge and experience when he speaks. Be sure not to interrupt, be respectful and never talk back.

3. Ask questions to senior students first. If you are unsatisfied with the answer then you can ask your Sifu in order that you may understand. Never be afraid to ask.

4. Your proper posture when addressing your Sifu is standing with feet together and hands at side. Instructors should be addressed by their appropriate titles such as Sifu, Master or Grandmaster.

5. In the presence of the Shifu, Master, Grandmaster or Elders proper conduct is a must you will be expected to honor.
a. Open doors for them.
b. Rise when they enter the room.
c. Always keep an eye on your Sifu while traveling. Look out for his best interest.
d. When traveling, as in a dining or in a vehicle, offer them the best seat available. You are responsible for their comfort and their well-being.

6. When introductions are necessary, always introduce the individual with the highest rank first.

7. Respectfully greet the Sifu when entering the school and bid them good-bye when leaving – always with a bow.

8. Kung Fu means skill and ability developed through hard work; so work hard and always have the right attitude. Be very careful to have the highest respect and be on your best behavior.

Wu Tang Martial Arts Academy Rules of Conduct

Shifu Jamie Hooper began his martial arts career in 1971 after seeing Bruce Lee in what was released in the US as "The Chinese Connection" (we now know that the labels were accidentally switched at the factory with "Fists of Fury").

In 1971 North Alabama offered little in the way of martial arts variety, so at age eight Sifu Hooper started training in what is known now as "old" Taekwondo. Traveling extensively throughout the US to compete in Martial Arts Tournaments gave him the opportunity to meet many masters in a wide array of styles. Being a gifted student, he was able to learn a great deal from many masters who he met at these events. During the twelve years in which he competed he won nearly 600 Titles including 65 Grand Champion Titles. In 1981 he was rated as one of the top three competitors in the US and nicknamed "High-Kicking Jamie Hooper" by Karate Illustrated magazine who called him one of the top ten kickers in the Nation.

He started trainining at the age of 8 years old and by 15, he had intensified his training to over 7 hours per day. Shifu Hooper has studied many different martial systems including but not limited to: MiZong Luohan, Northern Shaolin, Hung Gar, Baguazhang, Xing Yi Quan, Multiple Styles of Northern Praying Mantis, the complete system of Wu Dang sword, and both Chen and Yang Style Taijiquan. He has studied and trained with some of the most prestegious martial artists in the world and is a disciple of Wu Tang Martial Arts under Grandmaster Tony Yang. There is no other martial arts training in the state of Alabama that offers the variety of systems taught by Shifu Hooper.

As an instructor, he has had numerous students win National Titles. Some of his students have even gone on to have successful careers in Television and Movies. Having also been inspired at a young age (by a Jackie Chan Movie) to learn Gymnastics and Tumbling, he trained with a coach from the US Olympic Gymnastics Team and a member of the famous Beijing Circus. He later began teaching Tumbling to the local High School Cheerleading Squad and soon he was teaching squads all over North Alabama achieving great success. Several of his squads won National Cheerleading Competitions.

Although he came from the small town (approx. 3000) of Moulton, AL he went on the accomplish what no other Martial Artist from the South has done before or since. Shifu Jamie Hooper is one of the most outstanding Martial Artists of the 20th century.

Reputation Vs. Character

Reputation is what you are supposed to be.
Character is what you are.

Reputation is the photograph.
Character is the face.

Reputation comes over one from without.
Character grows up from within.

Reputation is what you have when you come to a new community.
Character is what you have when you leave it.

One's reputation can be learned in an hour.
One's character is built over a lifetime.

Reputation grows like a mushroom.
Character grows like an oak.

A single newspaper report gives one a reputation.
A life of dedicated works gives one character.

Reputation makes one rich or poor.
Character makes one joyful or miserable.

Reputation is what men say about one on their tombstone.
Character is what the angels say about one before the Throne of God.

Contact

Master Jamie Hooper is available for private lessons exclusively.
Please contact him by email at JamieRHooper@gmail.com
You can also connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

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